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Baba Ghanooge
 
An eggplant based dip that is rapidly gaining in popularity. The mixture of baked eggplants, Tahini, and garlic make a wonderful tasting dip. If you had wondered how to prepare those large eggplants you find in the supermarket, Baba Ghanooge is the answer!
 
1 large eggplant
2 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons Tahini
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 cup yogurt
3 tablespoons olive oil
several whole olives
 
Heat oven to 400 degrees
Place whole eggplant on a baking sheet and bake until outer shell is crisp and inside is soft and mushy. A fork should pass easily through the eggplant when done (about 1 hour).
Let the eggplant cool, then remove and discard black skin and green cap. Spoon the insides into a food processor or a blender.
Add garlic, Tahini, salt, lemon juice and yogurt. Puree until creamy.
Spoon into a serving dish and garnish with olive oil and whole olives.
Serve cold or warm with sliced Pita bread and/or vegetables for dipping.
 
                                       
 
Baklava
 
A universal dessert. Baklava is known in many cultures including the Middle East, Greek, Eastern Europe, and even in Western Europe and the United States.
Each culture has its unique mixture and ingredients combination. The one listed below is just one of the many possibilities. Honey is used here as a topping syrup, but you can use home-made syrup made from white cane sugar, or, you can serve it dry.
 
1 1/2 pounds chopped walnuts
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 pound melted sweet butter
2 pounds thin sheet Fillo, or shredded Fillo Dough
1 cup honey
 
To make the stuffing, combine and mix walnuts, sugar and cardamom. Set aside.Brush a baking dish measuring about 9x13x2 inch with some of the melted butter.
Spread one Fillo sheet flat in the pan, brush with about 1 teaspoon butter.
Stack about 15 Fillo sheets using this method.
Spread one half of the stuffing mixture on the Fillo sheets.
Spread and butter about five Fillo sheets on top of the first layer of stuffing.
Spread the remaining half of the stuffing on top.
Spread and butter about 15 Fillo sheets to make the top and final layer. Use more butter if you run out, or use less for each Fillo layer.
With a sharp knife, cut in diamond, or square shapes.
Pour remaining melted butter on top.
Bake in 350 degree oven for about 30 minutes, or until the surface turns light golden color.
Pour honey over Baklava. When at room temperature, transfer individual pieces onto a serving dish.
Serve at room temperature or chilled.
 
 
Basbousa
1 stick unsalted butter
1/2 cups almonds, chopped
1/2 cup yogurt
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup semolina
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 stick unsalted butter, melted
1 cup whipped cream
Syrup
1 cups sugar
1/3 cup water
juice of 1/2 lemon
1 tablespoon rose water (optional)
 
In a frying pan, melt the butter and fry the almonds in the butter until slightly brown. Strain the butter to remove the almonds bits. Set aside, keep at room temperature.
In a large mixing bowl, mix the yogurt and sugar until creamy.
In the mixing bowl, combine with the yogurt and sugar mixture the almonds, their frying butter, semolina, baking powder and vanilla extract. Mix until well blended.
Pour the mixture into a well oiled oven pan measuring about 9x9x2 inches.
Bake in a 400 degree oven for about 30 minutes.
Meanwhile, prepare the syrup by stirring the sugar, water and lemon juice over medium heat until thick to the point that it coats the metal spoon.
Add rose water (optional) and cook with stirring for a few more minutes until well mixed.
Remove from heat and cool slightly in the refrigerator.
Remove the Basbousa from the oven and pour the cold syrup over the hot Basbousa.
Cut into diamond shapes, then bake in the oven for 5 more minutes.
Pour melted butter over Basbousa, then spread whipped cream over it.
 
                                               
 
Cream of Rice Kibba (Kibba Hamidh)
 
This Kibba is different from the previously mentioned Kibbas, the shell is made from Cream of Rice, and not bulgur. This Kibba is the children's favorite, I make it often in response to my grandchildren's requests. Take care to make the shell as thin as possible (1/8 inch, or 3 mm), but do not allow for any holes to develop in it. Note: Where availabe, you may use ground turkey meat (for the shell only). Turkey meat has the least amount of fat, this makes for firm shell.
 
Shell:
3 cups cream of rice
1 cup cream of wheat
3 cups (loose) extra lean ground beef, lamb or turkey (see note above). Must be extra lean in order to hold its shape
1 teaspoon salt
water
 
Stuffing:
2 pounds ground lean beef (or lamb)
1 chopped onion
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon Middle Eastern spice
 
Sauce:
1 8-oz. can tomato sauce
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon salt
water
1 medium eggplant, quartered, or 1 pound turnip, cleaned, pealed and-quartered
 
Shell preparation:
In a bowl, mix cream of rice, cream of wheat, beef, lamb or turkey and salt.
While kneading, gradually add 1/2 cup water until the dough is sticky and uniform. Add more water if needed. Set aside.
 
Stuffing preparation:
Mix beef (or lamb), onion, salt and Middle Eastern spice. Kneed well.
 
Kibba preparations:
Keep a small bowl half full of water on your working table to wet your hands to prevent the dough from sticking to your hands.

Wet your hands, take a pinch of dough and form it in a shape of a walnut.
Flatten it in the palm of your hand to 1/2 inch thick disk.
Place 1 teaspoon of stuffing in the center of the disk leaving about 1/4 inch diameter of the dough uncovered.

Using both hands, bring the edges of the dough together and seal all around the stuffing.
Smooth the resulting Kibba by rolling it between the two palms of your hands into a ball shape or you can form it into a spindlee shape (elongated). Place ona cookie sheet side by side. Do not stack them on top of each other, for they will stick (or use plastic sheets to separate them).
Repeat until material is used up.
 
Cooking Directions:
Prepare the sauce using the sauce ingredients as described below.
In a 12-quart saucepan, place tomato sauce, lemon juice, garlic, salt and enough water to fill the saucepan halfway.
Bring the sauce to a boil on high heat.
Add the eggplant (or turnip). Let cook for 15 minutes or until cooked through.
Add the Kibba one at a time, cover and cook for 15 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.
                                              
 
Felafel
 
The patties:
1 lb. dried, pealed fava beans
Water
2 medium onions, quartered
2 large cloves garlic, chopped
1 bunch parsley, large stems removed
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 cups oil
 
The Yogurt dip:
1 cup yogurt
2 tablespoons tahini
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 glove garlic. Minced or pressed
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
 
Patty preparation:
Soak the fava beans in water over-night, or until very tender. Remove skin if present.
Combine the fava beans, onion, garlic, parsley, cumin, coriander, baking powder, salt and pepper in a blender. Grind until mixture becomes very smooth (it helps if you partially chop, or dice the ingredients before you put them in the blender). Let paste rest for 30 minutes.
Take walnut-sized lumps and make round, flat patties. Let the patties rest for about 15 minutes to preserve their shape.
Heat oil in a deep pan so that the patties can be submerged. Fry the patties until golden brown. Place them on a plate covered with paper towels to absorb excess oil.
 
Serve with pitta bread and yogurt dip.
 
Yogurt Dip preparation:
Combine all yogurt dip ingredients. Blend well and refrigerate. 
                                               
 
 
Himmus Bitahini
A dip that is popular with my guests, and is easy to make. Try it with your
guests, and be prepared to answer questions on how to make it. Dot with olives, and dust with paprika before serving, or if you are adventurous, dust with ground cayenne (red) pepper.
 
1 16-oz. can garbanzo beans (drained)
2 tablespoons Tahini
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup cold water
4 tablespoons olive oil
 
Place the garbanzo beans, Tahini, lemon juice, salt, garlic and water in a blender and puree until smooth.
Mix in 2 tablespoons olive oil by hand and place in a serving dish.
Pour the remaining olive oil on top and garnish with olives, snipped parsley and a pinch of ground cayenne.
 
 
Kabob
 
The word Shish Kabob is known world wide. This dish is popular in hundreds of countries, and likewise, it comes in hundreds of variations. The Kabob in this book is from ground lamb (or beef) that is shaped around skewer (Shish). This process can be messy for the beginner, but will get easier with practice. Remember to keep your hands damp with water so that the meat does not stick to it.
 
2 pounds ground lamb (or beef)
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1 small minced onion
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon Middle Eastern spice
2 tablespoon flour
 
You will need one or more flat metal skewer (approximately 1 inch wide), or any skewer will do (including bamboo skewers found in the oriental food sections in some grocery stores).
Mix all ingredients, kneed well.
Wet the palm of your hand so meat does not stick to it, take a portion of meat to make a single servings (approximately 2-3 ounces).
Shape meat portion like a cylinder.
Drive skewer through it lengthwise.
Wet your palm and shape the meat evenly around the skewer to take its shape. The individual kabob will be approximately 6-8 inches long.
If this is the only skewer you have, gently push meat out of skewer and place on a tray.
Repeat until all meat is used up. If you have to stack kabobs on each other, use plastic sheets to separate them.
Chill well in the refrigerator.
15 minutes before serving time, broil, bake, or barbecue kabobs turning once until done. Also broil several sliced tomatoes and-quartered onions.
Serve with Pita bread and green salad.
 
                                               
 
Pan Kibba
 
This recipe is a shape variety for those who can not make the traditional Kibba Mousel.
 
The shell:
Follow directions for making the shell in the recipe Kibba (Kibbi), Cover and
set aside.
 
The stuffing:
2 pounds ground lean lamb (or beef)
1 chopped onion
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon Middle Eastern spice
1/4 cup oil
1/4 cup water
 
Assembly and cooking directions:
In a 2-quart pan, cook the lamb (or beef), with the onion, salt and Middle
Eastern spice until meat is brown, drain fat and let cool. You can also add 1/2 cup mixture of each, toasted almonds and raisins. Toast the almonds first in a small pan with 1/2 tablespoon vegetable oil until brown, then add the raisins and stir until fluffy, remove, let cool, then mix with the meat.
Oil the bottom and sides of a pan measuring approximately 9x13x2 inches.
Wet two plastic sheets measuring about 9x13 inches and place one flat on your working area.
Divide the dough into 2 halves. Place first half on top of the first plastic sheet then spread it by hand to about 1 inch thick. If dough has gotten hard,
wet it with little water then kneed it to a soft consistency.
Place the second plastic sheet on top of the dough evenly.
With a rolling pin, roll the dough out until about 1/2 inch thick and as large as the pan you are using. Remove the top plastic sheet.
Repeat this method with the second half of the dough. Set aside.
Using the bottom plastic sheet, lift one of the dough sheets and place face down in the bottom of the pan then remove the plastic sheet. Wet your hands and pat dough down well. Now you have made the bottom layer of the Kibba.
Spread the cooked meat stuffing on top of this dough layer, spread it with a spoon evenly in the pan. Pat with your wet hands.
Place second dough sheet over meat. Pat well with your wet hands to cover all the meat.
With a sharp knife, cut the Kibba in place into squares about 2 inches in length.
Pour oil and water on top of the Kibba.
Bake in 350 degree oven for 30 minutes or until water is evaporated and Kibba begins to look crispy.
Remove from heat, let stand for 10 minutes.
Trace previous cuts and serve individual squares with a spatula.
Serve with salad and pickles.
                                        
 
Rice Pudding
 
6 cups milk
1 cup cream of rice (or 1 cups rice, washed, soaked over-night and crushed)
6 small crystals mistaki, crushed (found in Middle Eastern food stores)
1/4 cup orange blossom water (similar to rose water. It is found in Middle
Eastern food stores)
4 tablespoons melted butter
2 cups fine bread crumbs or corn meal
 
The syrup:
2 cups sugar
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoon orange blossom water
 
In a 5 quart pot, heat the milk (do not boil) with continuous stirring.
To the milk, add the cream of rice with continuous stirring until it thickens.
Add the mistaki and orange blossom water, stir for 2 minutes, then remove the bread pudding from the heat and set aside.
Grease an over-proof 13x9 inch pan with 2 tablespoons of the butter, then sprinkle 1 cup of the bread crumbs (or corn meal) on the bottom of the tray.
Pour the bread pudding in the tray, spread evenly. Sprinkle the remaining 1 cup of bread crumbs (or corn meal) over the rice pudding. Pour the remaining 2 tablespoons of melted butter on top.
Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10 minutes, or until firm. Remove from oven, let cool for about 10 minutes, then pour syrup (see below) over pudding evenly.
Syrup preparation:
In a 2 quart pan, combine sugar and water. Heat with continuous stirring until all sugar is dissolved and the mixture begins to boil.
Add the lemon juice and orange blossom water, mix well, remove from heat.                                               
 
 
Rice With Fava Beans
 
A wonderful and filling dish. The Fava beans and dill weed add a memorable
flavor to this dish. This rice dish may be eaten with salad only, or with other stews, such as Shebzy. You may use dehydrated Fava beans if you like, but soak them over-night before you use them.
 
1 pound lamb (or beef), diced
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon water
1 pound fresh Fava beans, removed from husk
1 small chopped onion
1 tablespoon dried Dill weed
4 cups water
2 cups long grain (such as Basmati) rice, uncooked
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon salt
 
In 5-quart saucepan, saute lamb (or beef) in 1 tablespoon oil and 1 tablespoon water over medium heat until brown.
Stir in fava beans, onion,and Dill weed for a few minutes or until soft. Add a little more water if needed.
Remove beans mixture and set aside.
In the same pot, bring the 4 cups water to a boil. Add rice, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and salt. Bring to a boil, cook until most water is absorbed, stir, then cover and reduce to low.
Let rice simmer for about 10 minutes or until soft. Mix beans mixture with rice, then let simmer for 15 more minutes, or until meal time.
                                       
 
Turkish Coffee
 
Turkish coffee is a strong coffee made with the darkest roast available (French, or Italian roasts). It is brewed with sugar, except at funerals, when it is presented bitter. A special ladle (Dellah) is used to brew the coffee. The
Dellah can be found in most Middle Eastern stores. There is a great deal of tradition associated with coffee. A traditional Turkish coffee is prepared with a great deal of care while roasting and grinding, and it is served in espresso-size cups (finjan). In the West however, we do what we can. I usually get the darkest roast available, and I ask the coffee bean shop to grind it for Turkish coffee use; this is the finest grind available.
 
4 teaspoons finely ground dark roast coffee
4 teaspoons sugar
4 portions of water 1/4 cup each (or 4 volume each, equal to one of your
espresso cups)
 
Combine the coffee, sugar and water in a Dellah.
With continuous stirring on high heat, heat the coffee mixture until near
boiling point.
Remove from heat, let set for few seconds so the coffee grounds settle down, then pour in four finjans.
Makes four servings.
 

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN
 
WHOLEMEAL BREAD
 
INGREDIENTS
four cups of wholemeal
half a teaspoon with salt
two cups of warm water
 
Mix the wholemeal, salt and water.
Knead the dough for five minutes, very hard.
Form this into little pieces, in a circle or a triangular shape.
Put these little breads on a greased baking plate.
Decorate the sides of these breads with your fingerprints.
Bake these breads half an hour in the oven on # 4.
 
Serve with date candies and, if you wish, decorate them with funny Egyptian animals.
 
 
ANCIENT EGYPTIAN CANDY
 
DATE CANDY
INGREDIENTS
a cup of fresh dates
a tea spoon full of cinnamon
a half tea spoon with kardemom sead
half a cup of fresh walnuts
a little bit of warm honey
a dish full of fine grinded almonds
 
Mix the dates with some water to paste.
Mix cinnamon and kardemon sead through the paste.
Knead the grinded walnuts through it.
Form from this balls at the size of candy.
Spread the candies with honey.
Dope this in grinded almonds.
 
This recipe was written down in ancient Egypt, 1600 BC, and is one of the first recipes ever made.
 
 
 
FIG CAKES
 
You will need:
A Blender
200g of fresh figs
ground cardamom
honey
50g of walnuts
50g of almonds
And here's how to do it:
1. With the blender, grind the almonds and walnuts seperately then
set them aside.
2. Chop the figs roughly and put them in the blender, adding just a little water.
3. Add the walnuts and cardamom and blend again, adding a little water if the mixture is too sticky.
4. Spoon the mixture out of the blender on to a clean surface. Shape the mixture into balls.
5. Roll the balls in honey and sprinkle with ground almonds.
 
 
MELOKHIA SOUP
 
INGREDIENTS:
for the broth
1 kilo lamb leg or 1 whole chicken
1,5 liter water
salt (as much as you like)
2 fine cut unions
2 strings garlic in rips
again 1,5 liter water
a hand full of pepper grains
 
for the soup
2 hectogram  wild spinach or 1,5 hectogram melokhia leaves
2 strings garlic (squeezed)
a little sunflower or olive oil.
a tea-spoon full of sharp pepper
2 Teaspoons full of grinded coriander
 
The flesh is added in medievil times.
Melokhia is a plant that looks like spinach.
Cut the melokhia leaves fine, untill it becomes a green paste.
Put the jelly-like paste in the broth, together with the garlic and the coriander.
This soup is served over dry bread, rice, little pieces of chicken and/or lamb, sometimes with a little vinegar.
Melokhialeaves are very hard to find.
Instead of this, it's possible to use wild spinach.
Instead of cutting it fine, one should cut it a little bit and let it
cook.
Put all the ingredients in a pan with a thick bottom for two hours and let it become broth.
Cut the little pieces of chicken and/or lamb and put them in the soup.
Cut the spinach or melokhia in little rips and put them also in the soup.
Put a little sunflower or olive oil in the baking pan.
Squeeze the strings garlic in the pan and bake them untill they are gold-brown of color.
Then put the harissa and coriander in it.
Now put the spicey paste in the soup.
Always keep mixing.
Make sure the melokhia or spinach doesn't become overdone.
Serve it with Turkish bread.
 
 
Eggplant With Vinegar & Garlic
 
 
This is a great starter for vegetarians. It is usually served as mezzeh. Also, it is a main dish for Egyptian Copts "Christians" during their fasting. They use it as a main dish or sandwiched.
 
500 g eggplant
cup white vinegar
5 cloves garlic crushed
Corn oil for frying eggplant
 
 
Peel and slice eggplant. Soak in salted water to prevent discoloration. Heat frying oil and fry eggplant until light brown. Put on paper towels to drain excess oil. Prepare sauce by putting vinegar and crushed garlic in a jar, close and shake well.
You can either serve sauce on the side or poured over fried eggplant. You can also serve it with Yogurt Salad. Serve hot, cold or at room temperature
Serves 2 as main dish, 4 as starter.
 
 
Fried Eggplant With Yogurt)
 
This is a perfect dish for hot summer days. Served as a main course or as a salad, it is very tasty.
 
1 kg eggplant
tsp dry mint
1 cup yogurt
tsp salt
4 cloves garlic crushed
fresh mint leaves for decoration
Corn oil for frying
 
 
Peel eggplants than slice or cut into thick cubes. Soak in salted water to prevent discoloration. Deep fry in corn oil until light brown and drain well on kitchen paper. In mortar, paste cloves, salt and dry mint. Add to yogurt and mix well.
Put fried eggplants in serving plate. Put Yogurt mixture in a sauce bowl. Decorate both with fresh mint leaves. Serve hot, cold or at room temperature.
Serves 4-6 as appetizer, 2-4 as main course.
 
 
White Cheese With Green Pepper
 
This appetizer is usually served as mezzeh or dip surrounded by crackers or grilled bread. It is also great for sandwiches.
 
 
250 g Feta cheese or any white half-salted cheese
2 medium green peppers tinly cubed or shredded
3 tbsp corn or olive oil
1 tbsp white vinegar
5 cloves garlic crushed
paprika to taste
juice of 2 lemons
cubed green pepper for decoration
 
 
Crush Feta cheese with a fork to smoothen. Add all other ingredients except oil. Mix well to obtain a thick spread consistency. Add 2 tbsp oil and mix. Put in serving bowl, sprinkle with remaining oil and cubed green pepper. Serve cold or at room temperature.
Serves 4.
 
 
White Cheese With Tomatoes
 
 
This appetizer is usually served as mezzeh or dip surrounded by crackers or grilled bread. It is also great for sandwiches.
 
250 g Feta cheese or any white half-salted cheese
2 medium firm tomatoes peeled, seeded and tinly cubed or shredded
3 tbsp corn or olive oil
1 tbsp white vinegar
5 cloves garlic crushed
paprika to taste
juice of 2 lemons
cubed tomatoes for decoration
 
 
Crush Feta cheese with a fork to smoothen. Add all other ingredients except oil. Mix well to obtain a thick spread consistency. Add 2 tbsp oil and mix. Put in serving bowl, sprinkle with remaining oil and cubed tomatoes. Serve cold or at room temperature.
Serves 4.
 
 
 
Harengs with Spring Onions & Green Pepper
 
This dish is usually served in Easter and Moslem "Small Bairam" feast (following the fasting holy month of Ramadan in which fish is seldom served). But for fish lovers, this is one of our favorites. It is also served as mezzeh.
 
2 medium smoked harengs ( approx. 500 g)
4 spring onions diced
corn or olive oil
2 green peppers diced
Juice of 6 lemons
 
 
Hold the hareng over the stove close enough to the fire to slightly grill without burning the flesh. Make sure to cover your stove with foil, around the flame, as this operation spills some oil from the hareng. We don't want to get messy, do we?
This will help you skin the fish very easily with your fingertips while still hot. After skinning and removing all bones from fish, (some are very tiny and will just have to stay) shred in small pieces and put in large bowl. Add diced onions, green pepper and lemon juice. Mix very well. Put in a clean dry jar. Cover with oil and close tightly. Leave in an airy place or in fridge for at least 6 hours before serving. Serve, decorated with lemon wedges, with crackers or grilled bread at room temperature.
Serves 6.
NB: Make sure to use a clean dry fork or spoon when serving from jar to prevent spoiling. Preserves very well (approx. 4-6 months).
 
 
Mixed Salad
 
Egyptians'daily salad. It is always served with fish and rice dishes. This is the basic salad, but, of course you can add whatever raw vegetables you like. Why not try chopped raw spinach? A real treat. Vegetarians can omit yogurt from the dressing and have a delicious salad.
 
4 medium cucumbers
2 medium tomatoes
1 medium lettuce
1 large onion
2 medium green peppers
3 cloves garlic crushed
1 tsp dry mint
1 tbsp yogurt
2 tbsp corn or olive oil
1 tsp salt
cup vinegar
 
 
Wash vegetables thoroughly. Peel onion. Cut all in very small cubes and mix in large bowl. Note that you can peel the cucumbers and tomatoes, but keeping the skin makes the salad more colorful and richer in vitamins.
Prepare the seasoning by mixing all other ingredients. Pour over salad and mix well. Serve cold or at room temperature.
Serves 4-6.
 
 
 
Grilled Salad)
 
Originally Tunisian, it was adopted very quickly by Egyptians and is very often served with barbecues. Excellent for veggies.
 
3 large tomatoes
4 medium green peppers
4 medium onions
cup olive oil
cup vinegar
tsp dried mint
tsp salt
3 cloves garlic crushed
juice of 3 lemons
 
 
Wash vegetables and cut into medium cubes. Grill over stove, in oven or over barbecue rack. Put in a bowl and wait to cool. Prepare dressing by mixing all other ingredients. Pour over grilled vegetables and mix well. Serve cold or at room temperature.
Serves 4-6.
 
Variation: You can add any grilled leftovers to this salad (steak, chicken, fish) and name the salad by the name of the added ingredient.
 
  
 Beetroot Salad
 
This salad is served with grilled meat and as mezzeh. Excellent for veggies.
 
3 medium size beetroots
cup Tehina
3 cloves garlic crushed
tsp salt
5 tbsp corn or olive oil
juice of 5 lemons
1 green onion chopped (for decoration)

lemon wedges (for decoration)
 
 
Wash beetroots very well. Boil until well cooked. Drain and leave to cool. Peel and cut into cubes. Leave some for decoration. Mash the rest in a food processor or using a vegetable grinder. Add Tehina, garlic, salt, lemon juice and oil. Mix very well. Put in a serving plate and even the surface with back of spoon. Sprinkle with chopped green onion and some oil. Decorate with lemon wedges and cubed beetroot. Serve cold or at room temperature
Serves 4-6.
 
 
 
Potato Salad
 
This salad is served as mezzeh and to accompany fish and barbecues. Excellent for veggies.
 
4 large potatoes
3 tbsp chopped parsley or celery
3 cloves garlic crushed
salt and pepper to taste
4 tbsp corn oil
4 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp mustard
tsp Tabasco sauce
 
Wash potatoes and boil with skin. When done, wait to cool then peel and cut into small cubes. Paste garlic with salt and pepper in mortar. Add oil, vinegar, mustard and Tabasco sauce and mix well. Put cubed potatoes in bowl. Pour dressing over potatoes and mix with caution. Sprinkle with chopped parsley or celery. Serve cold or at room temperature.
Serves 4-6.
 
 
 
Ratatouille)
 
Excellent salad. It can be served with yogurt or steamed rice to form a tasty meal for veggies.
 
500 g eggplant peeled and diced
250 g green pepper diced
250 g tomato skinned and diced
8 cloves garlic crushed or sliced
cup corn oil
cup vinegar
1 stock cube
salt and pepper to taste
corn oil for fring
 
Fry eggplant, drain and set aside. Fry green pepper, drain and set aside. In thick saucepan, heat cup corn oil and stir in cloves until golden. Season with salt and pepper. Add vinegar and tomatoes. Keep stirring until nearly cooked. Add eggplant, green pepper and stock cube. Simmer for 20-30 minutes over low heat. Serve hot or cold.
Serves 4-6.
 
 
Karkady - Hibiscus Tea
 
Karkady is one of the most popular and unusual drinks that you can find in Egypt. Made from the dried, dark red petals of the Hibiscus flower.  It is served in many of the popular cafe's throughout Egypt. The best Karkady comes from Upper Egypt. Be sure to bring home a bag of dried petals from Aswan or Luxor.
 
1 cup hibiscus petals
2 cups sugar
Pick over the dried petals, removing any stems or leaves.  Soak the hibiscus petals in cold water to cover for 1-2 hours. Transfer the petals and water to a pot and bring to a boil. Remove the pot immediately and strain the liquid through filter paper.  Return the petals to the pot, add fresh cold water to cover, and repeat as above.  Repeat the process until the karkady loses its reddish hue.  Then, discard the petals and sweeten the juice while it is still hot.  Serve cold, although it is a pleasant drink when served warm in the wintertime.
 
It is possible to purchase hibiscus tea bags from other lands as a substitute, but the intensity of flavor will not be the same. I have found hibiscus tea bags from Poland in the international food department of a very large supermarket.
 
 
Lemonade
 
Place 6 cups water and 2 unpeeld, quartered lemons in a pot and bring to a boil, then cover and simmer over medium heat for 20 minutes. Strain into a teapot, stir in the 5 tablespoons sugar and  1 tablespoon Orange Blossom Water ( Mazahar ).  Bring to a boil and serve.
 
 
Add honey instead of sugar for variety
 
 
 Salata Balady
(Mixed Salad)
 
Egyptians'daily salad. It is always served with fish and rice dishes. This is the basic salad, but, of course you can add whatever raw vegetables you like. Why not try chopped raw spinach? A real treat. Vegetarians can omit yogurt from the dressing and have a delicious salad.
 
Ingredients
4 medium cucumbers
2 medium tomatoes
1 medium lettuce
1 large onion
2 medium green peppers
3 cloves garlic crushed
1 tsp dry mint
1 tbsp yogurt
2 tbsp corn or olive oil
1 tsp salt
cup vinegar
 
Wash vegetables thoroughly. Peel onion. Cut all in very small cubes and mix in large bowl. Note that you can peel the cucumbers and tomatoes, but keeping the skin makes the salad more colorful and richer in vitamins.
Prepare the seasoning by mixing all other ingredients. Pour over salad and mix well. Serve cold or at room temperature.
Serves 4-6.
 
 
Thomeyya   
(Garlic Spread)
 
Here is another Lebanese/Syrian sauce used frequently. It is used with everything, specially grilled meat and sandwiches.
 
Ingredients
2 garlic heads
2 toasts
Juice of 2 lemons
5 tbs water
some milk
salt & white pepper to taste
 
 
Peel garlic. In food processor, mince garlic very finely. Repeat operation if necessary.
Soak toasts in a little milk, then drain. Add to minced garlic. Put garlic and toasts in mortar. Season. Add water alternating with lemon juice and beat well after each addition until you reach a very smooth creamy mixture. It should cover the back of a spoon.
Use as directed in recipes.
Yields cup.